Request a Planned Giving Packet

Did you know that…

  1. Only 32% of Americans report having a will or estate planning documents?!
  2. The average age a person in the US make their first will/estate plan is 44 years old?
  3. The coolest thing about leaving a nonprofit (or two!) in your will is that ANYONE can do it, whether you have one dollar or $10 million to your name 🙂 YOU are absolutely someone who can make a legacy gift to Bridgercare!

While it can be scary and uncomfortable to think about these things, it is incredibly important to make a plan (and the sooner the better!) to make sure your loved ones are taken care of and your wishes honored.

Whether you are new to making a will or an seasoned expert in the world of estate planning, you have the option of leaving a legacy for Bridgercare by including us in your will or living trust. This is a gift that will cost you nothing during your lifetime, but can make all the difference in the world for generations to come. YOU can make sure that all people have access to affordable, affirming, and empowering sexual healthcare no matter happens in the future! Thank you for being such a dedicated supporter and continuing to lift up our whole community 🙂

And the great news is that it really isn’t too difficult to include Bridgercare and other nonprofits in your will/estate plan/living trust. This is often called a bequest and here is some sample language you can use: 

I (insert your name and full mailing address) hereby give Bridgercare, a nonprofit organization currently located at 1288 N 14th Ave #201, Bozeman, MT 59715 and assigned the tax identification number EIN of 81-0363189, the sum of $______ or _____percentage of my estate for unrestricted use and purpose.

While we ourselves aren’t lawyers or experts on financial/estate planning, we are happy to connect you to resources or answer questions you might have! Please email Emily at eallison@bridgercare.org if you want to chat or fill out the form below to request more information on planned giving.

What three supporters had to say about their decision to put Bridgercare in their will:

When we were young with little income and no medical insurance – Douglas and I lived in Bozeman from 1980-1991 – Bridgercare was my only real medical care.  I had no primary doctor but I needed an annual and monthly birth control. We could never have afforded that on our own. Bridgercare provided such a valuable service, allowing me and many others to make the choice of if and when to have a family. It just seems right to give back. So even though we no longer live in Montana and have not for almost 30 years – we wanted our money to help the institution that helped us.

Thinking about estate planning was difficult for us to begin and year after year we put it off. One day we found an attorney who initiated thought-provoking conversations about making end-of-life decisions. That brought us to the realization that “We would like to think the work we did to build—even this very modest estate we have—goes somewhere that means something to us.”  Without those documents, someone else will decide the distribution of our assets.

Once we came to that eye opening realization, we found the process was easier than we thought. The paperwork is standard. Our attorney, having done this many times had great questions that helped us craft language to capture exactly how we wanted to put Bridgercare as a beneficiary in our wills.

We cannot go back in time, but we can pay it forward.

Carol and Douglas Bailey

The impacts of the pandemic and the ideological divide within our society have brought me to my knees in existential angst. On a personal level, I am hyperaware of life’s fragility and on a social level, I feel broken. I admit there are times when I have found myself lost in a whirlwind of fear, despair, and hopelessness because so much feels beyond my control. Curiously, I have found solace in the eye of that storm as I have learned to confront the finiteness of my life and the vulnerability of this moment by focusing my energy upon the legacy I wish to leave after I have died. As part of that process, I have chosen to include Bridgercare in my end-of-life estate planning, recognizing that I can continue to support a cause about which I deeply care long after I am gone. Although fierce storms continue to rage, this decision gives me peace as I am ‘unselfed’ from this disorienting moment and able to focus on supporting a cause for which I am deeply passionate. 

Josh Meyer